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Posts for: September, 2020

By City Square Dental
September 22, 2020
Category: Oral Health
Tags: mouthguards  
BruinsZdenoCharaBreaksHisJawDuring2019StanleyCup

Boston Bruins defenseman Zdeno Chara had a rough Stanley Cup final against the St. Louis Blues this past June. Not only did the Bruins ultimately lose the championship, but Chara took a deflected puck shot to the face in Game Four that broke his jaw.

With the NHL season now over, the 42-year-old Bruins captain continues to mend from his injury that required extensive treatment. His experience highlights how jaw fractures and related dental damage are an unfortunate hazard in hockey—not only for pros like Chara, but also for an estimated half million U.S. amateurs, many in youth leagues.

Ice hockey isn't the only sport with this injury potential: Basketball, football (now gearing up with summer training) and even baseball players are also at risk. That's why appropriate protective gear like helmets and face shields are key to preventing injury.

For any contact sport, that protection should also include a mouthguard to absorb hard contact forces that could damage the mouth, teeth and gums. The best guards (and the most comfortable fit) are custom-made by a dentist based on impressions made of the individual's mouth.

But even with adequate protection, an injury can still happen. Here's what you should do if your child has an injury to their jaw, mouth or teeth.

Recognize signs of a broken jaw. A broken jaw can result in severe pain, swelling, difficulty speaking, numbness in the chin or lower lip or the teeth not seeming to fit together properly. You may also notice bleeding in the mouth, as well as bruising under the tongue or a cut in the ear canal resulting from jawbone movement during the fracture. Get immediate medical attention if you notice any of these signs.

Take quick action for a knocked-out tooth. A tooth knocked completely out of its socket is a severe dental injury. But you may be able to ultimately save the tooth by promptly taking the following steps: (1) find the tooth and pick it up without touching the root end, (2) rinse it off, (3) place it back in its socket with firm pressure, and (4) see a dentist as soon as possible.

Seek dental care. Besides the injuries already mentioned, you should also see a dentist for any moderate to severe trauma to the mouth, teeth and gums. Leading the list: any injury that results in tooth chipping, looseness or movement out of alignment.

Even a top athlete like Zdeno Chara isn't immune to injury. Take steps then to protect your amateur athlete from a dental or facial injury.

If you would like more information about dealing with sports-related dental injuries, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. To learn more, read the Dear Doctor magazine articles “Athletic Mouthguards” and “The Field-Side Guide to Dental Injuries.”


By City Square Dental
September 12, 2020
Category: Oral Health
Tags: toothache  
YourToothacheMightSignalaProblemOtherThaninYourMouth

You expect a decayed tooth, a fracture or a gum infection to be the cause for that toothache causing you grief. Sometimes, though, the answer may be “none of the above”—there's nothing wrong going on in your mouth to cause the pain.

You pain is real—but its source is elsewhere in the body, a situation known as referred pain. It's important to find out the pain's true source to determine what kind of treatment you'll need to alleviate it.

Here are some of the likely candidates for a “toothache” that's not a toothache.

Facial nerves. Tooth pain may be associated with trigeminal neuralgia, a misfiring disorder of the trigeminal nerves that course through either side of the face. The nerve is divided into three branches, two of which are located in the upper face and one in the lower jaw. Because they're interconnected, a problem with one of the branches in other parts of the face could be felt in the branch around the jaw.

Jaw joints. Temporomandibular Joint Disorders (TMD) can cause pain in the pair of joints that connect the lower jaw to the skull. The joints can become inflamed due to stress or trauma and the associated muscles begin spasming, causing severe pain. Because of their proximity to the teeth, the pain from the joints can radiate into the dental area and mimic a toothache.

Ear or sinus infections. Both the ears and the maxillary sinus are subject to infections that can cause severe pain and pressure. With the close proximity of both the ears and the sinus to the upper jaw, it's quite possible for pain originating in these structures to be felt within the mouth.

These are only a few of the possibilities that also include migraines, shingles, fibromyalgia and even vitamin deficiencies. As such, your dentist or physician may need to do a little detective work to locate the true cause. But the effort to locate where your mouth pain is actually coming from will help ensure you get the right treatment to give you lasting relief.

If you would like more information on referred tooth pain, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Referred Pain: When a Toothache Is Not Really a Toothache.”


By City Square Dental
September 02, 2020
Category: Dental Procedures
ImproveYourSmileWithTheseDentalEnhancements

In case you missed it, September is Self-Improvement Month. Don't fret if you weren't aware—we're not sure how the ninth month acquired this celebration of positive human development either. But as long as we're celebrating, do something good for yourself—like improving your smile.

If this doesn't seem like a lofty enough self-improvement goal, remember this: There's much more to a smile than its looks. Smiles “speak” a social language, allowing us to wordlessly communicate acceptance, happiness, or even sympathy. A smile is a valuable part of beginning and maintaining relationships, be they familial, social or professional.

So why not go all out and enhance your smile during Self-Improvement Month? To that end, here are a few options:

Teeth whitening. Maybe your teeth are a little yellowed. If you have mild to moderate enamel staining, consider undergoing a professional whitening procedure. We use a safe but effective solution to give you just the level of brightness you want. And with proper maintenance and occasional touch-ups, you can have a brighter smile for years.

Bonding, veneers or crowns. If your teeth have chips, heavy discolorations or other mild to moderate defects, we can offer a variety of solutions. We can bond special dental materials to repair slight defects that make a tooth look good as new. For moderate flaws, heavy staining or slight gaps, we can bond a custom-made veneer to the front of teeth to hide these imperfections. We can also cap teeth with natural-looking crowns to cover larger disfigurements.

Orthodontics. Misaligned teeth can detract from an otherwise attractive smile. Orthodontics can help—and as long as you're in good oral and general health, you can undergo bite correction at any age. Braces aren't your only option: Removable clear aligners are nearly invisible to others, and because they're removable, they make it easier to keep your teeth clean.

Dental implants. Missing teeth can definitely dim a smile. And while there are a number of restoration options, dental implants are one of the top choices. Implants not only look and feel lifelike, they're exceedingly durable. Although they may be more expensive up-front, they have been shown to last longer and tend to require less maintenance than other restorations. Dental implants are a worthwhile investment in a long-term smile.

Cosmetic enhancements like teeth whitening or bonding may require only one or two visits, while other options like orthodontics or implants can take much longer. But you can still get the ball rolling now. Make an appointment this month for a full dental exam and consultation to start your journey toward improving your smile.

If you would like more information about enhancing your smile, please contact us or schedule a consultation. To learn more, read the Dear Doctor magazine article “Cosmetic Dentistry: A Time for Change.”